Tomb of Chinese 'Tyrant' Emperor Discovered; Burial Site Dates Back 1,500 Years

By : Subscribe to sangeetha's | April 17, 2013 4:01 PM IST

Chinese archaeologists have discovered a tomb in eastern China which is the final resting place of Emperor Yang Guang of Sui dynasty, who is notorious for his tyrannous reign.

The tomb, which dates back to 1,500 years, was found at a construction site in Yangzhou, Jiangsu province. Archaeologists have confirmed that the tomb belonged to Yang Guang, who was one of the worst rulers in the history of China, reported China Daily.

Until now, a fake burial site of Yang that is located about six kilometres from the construction site had been a tourist attraction for visitors. But the newly-discovered site was confirmed as the emperor's final resting place based on an inscription found on a tablet in the tomb, according to Shu Jiaping, director of Yangzhou's archaeological bureau.

"Yang's tomb wasn't even as luxurious as normal rich people's tombs in the Sui Dynasty, due to his sudden death when he fled revolts to Jiangdu, which is Yangzhou today," Shu was quoted as saying by the China Daily.

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The tomb, which is 4.98 metres long from north to south and 5.88 metres long from east to west, has been robbed several times since the emperor's death. However, archaeologists found four valuable artifacts that were used by the ancient royal family members.

The valuables include a lion-shaped door knockers that are made of gold and iron, a jade belt decorated with gold as well as a loop-shaped copper handle. The tomb, which was discovered last year, is connected to another tomb, which archaeologists believe that it may belong to the emperor's wife, Xinhua news agency reported.

Emperor Yang Guang has always been remembered as a fearsome tyrant. During his reign in the Sui Dynasty (AD 581-618), he made thousands of people to work as labourers in construction projects like building royal palaces, leisurely boats, completion of Grand Canal as well as the reconstruction of the Great Wall.

The emperor was killed during a failed conquest of Goguryeo, an ancient kingdom of Korea, in 618 AD that marked the collapse of the Sui dynasty.

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