Eid ul Fitr 2016: When will Eid be celebrated in India and other countries?
How Eid al Fitr is celebrated around the world. Pictured: Muslim people greeting each other.Reuters

Eid al Fitr, also known as Eid ul Fitr or simply Eid, is round the corner and the entire Muslim community around the world is ready to celebrate the big festival. Although Eid 2016 will be celebrated on different dates in different countries, the celebrations are more or less similar around the world, with a couple of unique local practices that are particular to certain countries.

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Eid al Fitr marks the end of the Holy month of Ramadan during which the devotees hold fasts. Eid is celebrated after the moon sighting committees in respective countries officially announce the conclusion of Ramadan.

India, which has one of the highest population of Muslims, celebrates Eid with great fervour. The night before Eid is called the "Chaad Raat" in India when families gather in open areas to see the new moon, officially signalling the end of Ramadan. People across the country arrange big feasts and many non-Muslim people also join the celebrations.

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Saudi Arabia witnesses one of the grandest Eid celebrations with all round flamboyant decorations and lavish feasts. This festival demands devotees to showcase their generosity and hospitality. Apart from children receiving gifts and sweets from kins, people buy food items, depending on their financial ability, and keep those outside the doors of the less privileged houses.

Afghanistan has a unique way of celebrating Eid as egg fights are much popular in the country on the occasion. A family will buy around 200 to 300 eggs on an average, boil them and paint them in seven colours- red, purple, green, yellow, pink, black and white. Participants in the game then will gather in an open space and try to crack each other's eggs. The game is known as "Tokhm-Jangi."

Eid is more commonly known as "Seker Bayrami" in Turkey and is marked by children going door to door, wishing people and receiving traditional sweets in return. Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei follow the custom of "Mudik" or "Balik Kampung." People meet their family and relatives to ask for forgiveness and oil lamps are used to decorate the homes.

People in Indonesia celebrate the occasion by preparing "Kue Lapis Legit," also called the thousand layered cake. It is made of flour, butter and a number of spices, inspired by the Dutch cuisine. Eid celebration in other countries like Pakistan and Bangladesh are more or less same as people greet each other, arrange feasts and exchange gifts.