yelena isinbayeva
Will she be seen in the Rio Olympics 2016? Pictured: Yelena Isinbayeva of Russia reacts during the women's pole vault final during the world indoor athletics championships at the Atakoy Athletics Arena in Istanbul March 11, 2012.Reuters

As the Rio Olympics 2016 approaches, the question of Russia's participation in the games becomes more and more doubtful. It is expected that a final verdict on the nation's participation in the sporting event will come on Friday from the International Association of Athletics Federation (IAAF).

The development, as of now, has left most of the track and field athletes from the nation visibly upset and one of them is the prominent face, Yelena Isinbayeva.

The 34-year-old three-time Olympics medallist in pole vault (gold medal winner at the 2004 and the 2008 Olympics, as well as a bronze medal winner at the 2012 Olympics) has categorically mentioned that she will never compete in the 2016 Olympics under the flag of the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

Isinbayeva also argued that the IAAF decision to suspend Russian track and field athletes since November last year owing to a poor anti-doping record, has had a devastating effect on clean athletes like her, who have never taken course to doping.

"I understand that the I.A.A.F. needs to take strong action to eradicate doping. But I do not think it is fair to forbid me and other clean Russian athletes to compete — athletes who have repeatedly proved they are innocent of cheating," Isinbayeva wrote in her column in the New York Times.

"Indeed, over the course of nearly 20 years of competition, including throughout my four Olympic cycles, I have never failed a doping test — be it in London, China, the United States or any of the European countries where I have vaulted."

Isinbayeva, who has won a whopping seven gold medals in the Pole Vault World Championships, also mentioned that the IAAF order gives a major setback to the clean athletes from Russia who are inspirations for the younger lot. She also suggested that she would carry on her fight until justice is served.

"There have been suggestions that I compete under the I.O.C. flag. But this doesn't seem like a real possibility," she continued. "If I compete, it will be as a Russian. If the entire Russian team is suspended, I will be suspended, too.

"Banning me and my fellow athletes from the Olympics would not just be devastating to us, but would also set back our efforts to inspire young people. I am determined not to miss the chance to achieve my Olympic dream. And I will fight for my right to help the next generation achieve theirs."

Isinbayeva had stated last month that she would file a suit in an "international court regarding human rights" if the clean Russian athletes are barred from taking part in Rio 2016.

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