Alabama
The Alabama police officer who assaulted an Indian man last year is set to be acquitted, after a federal judge dismissed a civil rights case against him on Wednesday, 13 January 2016. In picture: A woman walks past a mural depicting Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Selma, Alabama, January 8, 2015.Reuters

The Alabama police officer, who assaulted an Indian man and left him partially paralysed last year, is set to be acquitted after a federal judge dismissed a civil rights case that had accused the policeman of using excessive force. 

58-year-old Sureshbhai Patel, who was visiting his son's family in the United States in February last year, was seen being slammed to the ground face first by Madison police officer Eric Parker in footage from cameras inside the patrol vehicles. 

The American police officer claimed he was investigating a complaint of a "suspicious person" and said that Patel did not heed to his orders. 

Patel, who hails from Gujarat, said that he did not understand English and hence, could not understand the officer. 

US District Judge Madeline Haikala granted a motion to acquit Parker on Wednesday stating that evidence presented in two trials did not clear doubts over the officer's guilt and added that "the court has no reason to expect a different result in a subsequent trial," The Associated Press reported. 

The judge said that there were "insurmountable" gaps in the evidence and that the video did not show critical aspects, including the police officer's version that Patel had tried to put his hand inside his pocket when the officer was questioning him. 

Patel suffered spinal injuries in the incident and had said that his limbs had become numb due to the impact form being thrown on the ground. 

The Indian was only a few days into his visit to the United States after his son and daughter-in-law had a baby. 

He was out on a walk on 6 February, 2015 when the incident took place. 

The video of the assault had sparked anger and the Governor of Alabama had issued an apology after the Indian government raised concerns.