The last words heard from the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 is revealed but the theory that there is an ongoing secret official negotiation with hijackers is gaining notice.
The last words heard from the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 is revealed but the theory that there is an ongoing secret official negotiation with hijackers is gaining notice. REUTERS

The last words heard from the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 has been revealed for the first time at a meeting in Beijing on Wednesday morning held between Malaysian government and Chinese relatives.

Before the flight disappeared from radar screens, the Malaysia's civil aviation heard the words, "All right, good night", The Straits Times reported.

There is however, conflicting reports on what exactly were the last words. The BBC says that the last heard reply from flight MH370 was "All right, roger that".

The meeting held in a packed room with nearly 400 relatives at the Metropark Lido hotel in Beijing, non-the-less, is important as anguished family members were given the chance to ask direct questions to the investigating authorities for the first time.

However, the meeting has reportedly spurred more questions than answers.

Despite a massive international search operation from 10 different countries, the flight MH370 carrying 239 passengers and crew including 153 Chinese nationals, has been missing since 1:20 am on Saturday.

?

The Malaysian civil aviation official told the family members present there that the disappearance from radar screens could be a result of a hijacking and hijackers turning off signals. But the officials added that if such was the case, the pilot should have sent what they called a 'secret mayday code'.

Responding to earlier reports that the co-pilot had allowed teenage girls inside the cockpit in 2011, the officials added that there was no reason to suspect the pilots. They were experienced and had passed all the checks that the ministry applies to the pilots.

The family members reportedly asked the official present during the meeting if military-grade radar had picked up the plane.

The official seemed to digress from the question when he said that the military was assisting investigations "at a high level".

When the family members repeatedly asked the male official present, he reportedly only said "now is not the time to reveal it."

The incident bolsters a viral theory circulating among the worried members of the family that there are some ongoing secret negotiations with terrorist who possibly hijacked the plane, the Strait Times noted. The official had also said earlier that he hoped that the passengers are alive.

Adding to the mystery was the curious case of phones of the passengers still ringing. The families handed over the number of a passenger's cellphone which had reportedly been ringing until Wednesday to the envoy and pressed for an answer on whether the plane was on land or the ringing phone suggested phone being either transferred to some other number or the call being cross connected.

But as of now there is no clear answer on what the ringing phone mystery suggests.