Uri terror attack
Mumbai, IndiaPeople hold candles and placards during a vigil for the soldiers who were killed after gunmen attacked an Indian army base in Kashmir's Uri on Sunday, in Mumbai, India, September 19, 2016.Reuters

Amid escalating tension and rising clamour to isolate Pakistan at all major international forums in the aftermath of the Uri terrorist attack, India on 21 September summoned the Pakistani high commissioner in New Delhi, Abdul Basit. India said it is ready to provide evidence on Uri and Pooch attacks if Pakistan is ready to investigate them.

Indian Foreign Secretary S Jaishankar summoned the Pakistan high commissioner to the Ministry of External Affairs. Basit was reminded of the "solemn commitment" Pakistan had made when it signed the Islamabad joint statement in January 2004.

Pakistan had assured under the joint statement -- signed between the then Indian prime minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee and former Pakistani president Pervez Musharraf -- that it will not permit any territory under its control to be used to support terrorism in any manner. 

On Wednesday, India stressed that the "growing violation" of this was "a matter of very serious concern." It further noted that the attack on the Indian Army base in Uri highlighted the fact that terrorist infrastructure in Pakistan was "active". 

India further noted with concern the marked increase in cross-border attacks both from the Line of Control (LoC) and international boundary. It said that there had been 17 such attempts and 31 terrorists were eliminated in the process.

Basit was reminded of the two ongoing Army operations to neutralise terrorist at the LoC. Additionally, India listed the items that have been recovered after the recent attacks:

(a) GPS from the bodies of terrorists with coordinates that indicate the point and time of infiltration across the LoC and the subsequent route to the terror attack site

(b) Grenades with Pakistani markings

(c) Communication matrix sheets

(d) Communication equipment and

(e) Other stores made in Pakistan, including food, medicines and clothes.

The Indian government also offered the Pakistani government the necessary "fingerprints and DNA samples of terrorists killed in the Uri and Poonch incidents," if they wish to investigate the cross-border attacks. India said it expected a response from Pakistani government on this.

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