Having green space near house can improve mental health

New Delhi, Jan 10 (ANI): A new research has shown for the first time that green space does appear to improve mental health in a sustained way. Mathew P. White and colleagues note that mental well-being is a major public health issue, with unipolar depressive disorder the leading cause of disability in middle- to high-income countries. Some research suggests that part of the blame for this unhappiness lies in increased urbanization - nearly 80 percent of the world's population in more developed regions live in city environments, which tend to have little room for nature. Other studies suggest a link between happiness and green space, but no research had convincingly established cause and effect of nature on well-being over time. To help fill that gap, White's team decided to examine the issue. Jan 10, 2014

Moderate coffee consumption 'not linked' to dehydration

New Delhi, Jan 10 (ANI): Researchers have dispelled the myth that coffee consumption can cause dehydration, as they have found that drinking moderate amounts of coffee does not result in dehydration and contributes to daily fluid requirements in regular coffee drinkers just as other fluids do. New study by the researchers at the University of Birmingham School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, UK, is the first study to directly assess the effects of a moderate consumption of coffee compared to equal volumes of water. "Despite a lack of scientific evidence, it is a common belief that coffee consumption can lead to dehydration and should be avoided, or reduced, in order to maintain a healthy fluid balance. Our research aimed to establish if regular coffee consumption, under normal living conditions, is detrimental to the drinker's hydration status," lead author of the study, Sophie Killer said. Jan 10, 2014

Mother's touch critical for preemies

New Delhi, Jan 8 (ANI): Scientists have claimed that the benefits that premature infants gain from skin-to-skin contact with their mothers is measurable even 10 years after birth. In a new study, Dr. Ruth Feldman, a Professor at Bar-Ilan University, and her team studied the impact of different levels of physical contact on prematurely born infants. Specifically, the researchers compared standard incubator care to a novel intervention called " Kangaroo Care" (KC), which uses the mother's body heat to keep their babies warm. Jan 8, 2014