Advertisers Should Only Pay For Ads That Are Actually Seen By Users: Facebook
[Representational Image] Facebook is of the opinion that advertisers should only pay of ads that are actually viewed by internet users.Reuters

Social media giant Facebook released the "State of Connectivity 2015: A Report on Global Internet Access", revealing that the global Internet user base reached 3.2 billion at end of the 2015, up 200 million compared to the previous year.

The remarkable Internet access growth is attributed to more affordable data packs and rising global incomes in 2014.

The report also pointed out there are still around 4.1 billion people yet to get access to the Internet.

"Facebook is deeply committed to finding a path to connect everyone in the world, and believes this will only be possible through wide collaboration. A community of like-minded organizations is already working together towards this goal, and this report aims to add to the global discussion and encourage more parties to join the cause, (sic)" the company said in a statement.

However, Facebook's pet project "Free Basics", which the company claims will benefit underprivileged people to get free Internet access, has drawn flak as it apparently violates net neutrality.

Also read: India's Internet user-base to breach 50 crore this year: Govt

That being said, Facebook's other works related to Internet access in remote locations have received appreciation. For instance, Facebook's newly established division Connectivity Lab is testing an unmanned solar-powered aircraft named Aquila. It is capable of flying at 60,000 feet and staying airborne for months with no maintenance, beaming high-speed wireless Internet connectivity in remote areas.

Also read: Project SkyBender: Google working on solar-powered drones to beam 5G internet

The Facebook report has pointed out that Internet access is available mostly in cities. When fully operational, Project Aquila, in association local governments across the world, is expected to change things for good.

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